Gucci Go Fur Free Fur Debate

News in that Gucci is going “Fur Free” starting from SS18. President and chief executive, Marco Bizzarri, announced the move at a talk at the London College of Fashion, yesterday.

Mr Bizzarri said: “Being socially responsible is one of Gucci’s core values, and we will continue to strive to do better for the environment and animals.” The brand will no longer use any type of animal fur including, coyote, mink, fox, rabbit or karakul - aborted lamb foetuses.

The fashion house’s remaining fur clothing will be sold in an auction with the money donated to the animal rights organisation "Humane Society International” and “LAV”, an organisation that initiates legal actions to assert animal rights.

Left - Gucci Intarsia Mink - £28,340 from Mytheresa

Gucci will also join the Fur-Free alliance. This is a group of international organisations that campaigns for animal welfare and encourages that alternatives to fur are used by the fashion industry.

I respect Gucci’s decision and being the world’s second largest luxury goods company this will make an impact. It will also influence people and other brands. Any company wishing to be more “sustainable” should be encouraged. (Just how sustainable a business selling US$ 4.3 billion (2016) worth of product is debatable BTW).

But, what I never understand is the double standards on animals. You either use animals or you don’t. Gucci will no doubt still be using snakes, alligators, crocodiles, goats, lizards, ostriches, the list goes on, to make accessorises and clothes. 

I’ve seen this many times before. I’ve been at Ralph Lauren where they proclaim to be “fur free” yet I’m standing next to a large crocodile “Ricky” bag. If brands really want to minimise their footprint then they should go completely vegan. Department stores stating they don’t sell fur, yet you look into a felt hat and it’s made from rabbit.

The fur industry doesn’t have to be “cruel” in the same way the meat industry doesn’t. Skins such as sable are shot in the wild and don’t live in cruel conditions. Coyotes are shot as pests in North America. You regulate for welfare standards and promote compassion in farming and every animal regardless of the product should be respected and cared for. 

The fur industry can be sustainable and faux-fur, usually made from synthetics, is also detrimental to the environment and doesn't negate the desire.

Net-a-Porter group recently announced it was going fur free too. Admittedly, due to the prices, fur is only bought in small quantities and by very wealthy people. It’s interesting that Italian companies - Yoox/Net-a-Porter and Gucci are going “Fur Free” as we know those Italians like their furs, so this is definitely a shift in attitudes.

These things usually go in two ways - fur trims start to sneak in and the thing gets quietly shelved or companies continue to be "environmentally friendly" and really try and do something about the wasteful fashion cycle that currently exists. Banning "fur" isn't really touching on the real environmental impact of the fashion industry.

Wednesday, 11 October 2017 14:38

TheChicGeek’s Best Men’s Corduroy AW17

Best Men's Corduroy Prada

Best Men's Corduroy Prada

We haven’t had a big fabric trend in menswear for a while now. Gone are the days when colours or fabrics would become ubiquitous for that season and every store and brand would toe the same line. But, there are exceptions, and corduroy is having a good stab at bringing itself back.

Lead by Prada, corduroy, in all its brushed softness, is perfect when coming in the reds and rusts of autumn. A tactile fabric, corduroy is hardwearing and can flit between casual and smart in all its bookish charm.

I love the fact the Germans called corduroy “Manchester” which was the home of “Cottonopolis” and a major manufacturer of corduroy for many years.

Left - Prada Menswear AW17

Corduroy can add bulk so be carefully when choosing a shape or style. For something cooler and more casual look for jeans jackets with matching trousers. I really like what the Spanish brand Lois are doing.

Below - Good News - Rhubarb Tan High - £60

Best Men's Corduroy Good News Trainers Sneakers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Best Men's Corduroy Lois Jeans JacketBest Men's Corduroy Lois JeansLeft - Lois Jeans - Jumbo Cord Brown Corduroy Jacket - £95, Dallas Jumbo Brown Corduroy Trousers - £65 from Stuarts London

Below - Vetements - Darted-Knee Cotton-Corduroy Trousers - £1200 from matchesfashion.com

Best Men's Corduroy Vetements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Best Men's Corduroy Drake's JacketBest Men's Corduroy Drake's TrousersLeft - Drake’s - Single-Breasted Green Cotton Cord Jacket - £595, Green Cotton Cord Suit Trousers - £255

Below - Junya Watanabe - Cotton-Corduroy Baseball Cap - £130 from matchesfashion.com

Best Men's Corduroy Junya Watanabe Cap

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Best Men's Corduroy PradaLeft- Prada - Slim-Fit Leather-Trimmed Cotton-Corduroy Suit Jacket - £1805 from MRPORTER.COM

Best Men's Corduroy Jigsaw shirtLeft - Jigsaw - Garment Dye Corduroy Button Down Shirt - £79

Below - ASOS - Tapered Cord Trousers In Rust - £30

Best Men's Corduroy Asos

Best Men's Corduroy Marks Spencer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Left - Marks & Spencer - Straight Fit Corduroy Trousers With Stretch - £35

Tuesday, 10 October 2017 13:16

HotList The Floral Silk Shirt

Ossie Clark Menswear Silk Shirt Pretty Green

This is so ChicGeek. I saw this shirt at Pitti Uomo in January. While it was a little bit nippy for silk in Florence, it didn’t get above zero, this dreamy Ossie Clark style shirt stood out on the Pretty Green stand. Women have for so long enjoyed Celia Birtwell’s - Ossie’s former wife - prints on his vintage dresses and this printed shirt is pure 70s Ossie Clark, especially in silk.

This is romantic menswear. The menswear of front men, rock stars and part of the new decorated trend in menswear. Crafted from smooth silk, it’s not going to be cheap, and patterned with hand painted florals, it is cut in a slim fit and detailed with lustrous mother-of-pearl buttons. This is definitely an open-neck-letting-it-all-hang-out-type shirt.

It’s yet to hit Pretty Green online and in-store. I’m waiting with bated breath.

News just in, it's a bargain £130.

Ossie Clark Menswear Silk Shirt Pretty Green

This week's ChicGeek vlog including a review of the Panasonic iShaper trimmer, Dr Perricone's new CBx For Men range, MMUK Man eyebrow products, new UK label, Eiger Classic & Belvedere Vodka's single estate vodkas.

Tuesday, 19 September 2017 17:13

ChicGeek Comment Time To Ditch See Now Buy Now

Time To Ditch See Now Buy Now

Burberry has to be admired for trying “See Now, Buy Now” - the new way of showing clothes in-season and making them available straight away to buy after the catwalk show. While many brands have used the term or jumped on the bandwagon, they were truly the only global brand to do it on scale and fully commit.

Left - The recent AW17 Burberry Show in Clerkenwell

Other brands have done capsules, collaborations and the like, but on a much smaller scale. Some are still doing it, while others have dropped it already, but, it’s Burberry who we’ve been watching to see whether it works or not.

Burberry has done a great job at the logistics. The job of getting things in place: to drop the minute the catwalk has finished, unveiling online and in their network of retail stores and wholesale partners. 

They’ve experimented with it and while they’ve proved they can get things in the right places at the right time, unfortunately, it doesn't make for great clothes.

We are on the third collection now and they are no way as accomplished as the previous out of season shows. They still have the same Creative Director - Christopher Bailey - who I rate very highly, but it just shows that this way of working, restricted by manufacturing timetables, limits the ideas and collections. 

With “See Now, Buy Now” you’re alway working backwards. What can we make in time? Can our manufacturers make that, in the quantities we need, in time? No? Then, next idea.

What can we do? doesn't make for the most positive start to any collection. It’s too restrictive. It just makes for clothes that are basics with little details tacked on. The latest collection, shown a couple of days ago, illustrated this, literally. Chinos with doodles on or a let’s stick a silver/crystal thing on a quilted sweat shirt to jazz it up a bit. It’s not starting from a strong design base. You’re always working backwards.

Fashion collections often come together a few days before a show. Stylists or designers often ask for little pieces or accessorises to help form looks which have a clear voice and message and is what many trends rely upon. They worry about making them afterwards. This isn’t possible with see now, buy now, as it has be all signed off and produced months in advance. Burberry has over 500 shops in 50 countries. That’s a lot of product. Admittedly, the catwalk makes up a small percentage of the business, but it still has to be in the windows etc. 

Burberry See Now Buy Now

These clothes are also being made upfront. Many brands use a show to gage demand and then order accordingly. You either have a lot of wastage or you’re very conservative in your ordering of the more difficult and interesting pieces. This leads to boring stores and products.

Right - Burberry - White T-Shirt With Crystal Brooch - £495 - See Now, Buy Now isn't making for the best clothes says TheChicGeek, do you agree?

It’s time to ditch see now buy now. Burberry are good at deciding to drop things when they don't work. They tried to go it alone with their beauty offering, but realised things are too tough out there on your own and have now gone in with beauty giant, Coty. 

If it’s any consolation, they can be confident to know that if they couldn’t make it work, then nobody could make it work and can be very proud of themselves for trying something that many thought too difficult and didn't even entertain. 

Like all new ideas, some are more successful than others. This is one to put down to experience and it's time to let Christopher Bailey do what he does best.

As Christopher Bailey says goodbye to Burberry, read TheChicGeek's Ode To Christopher Bailey - here