Review Malin Goetz Brightening Enzyme Mask men's grooming expert

A gel-based mask that deeply cleanses and exfoliates dull, dry skin, improving overall tone and texture. This concentrated brightening treatment balances pomegranate and pumpkin enzymes with botanically derived AHAs, leaving skin softer, smoother. A quick, easy way to restore skin's glow without irritation; suitable for all skin types.

Left - Malin + Goetz Brightening Enzyme Mask - 60ml - £48

TheChicGeek says, “This looks very natural: a soft, jelly-like consistency, orange in colour, with little bits in it, it goes on easy like a light gel. It doesn’t smell particularly strong, a slight lemon scent and you leave for 5 minutes, then rinse off. All at night.

The website says ‘Use 1-3 times a week’ while the packaging says ‘Once Weekly’. 

Leaving on for only 5 minutes and using once a week makes you think it’s quite a powerful product which seems to go against its natural appearance. 'Brightening' often means lightening, so this could be the more serious side of the product, but it would be good if there was more explanation.

It is said to exfoliate, brighten and moisturise. My skin definitely felt clean and cleansed  - that’ll be the AHAs - when I got into bed after using this. They do recommended you apply SPF the day after.

I’d like to try this more to see if there were anymore noticeable differences other than that fully cleansed feeling.”

Friday, 07 September 2018 16:56

Label To Know Curionoir

Fragrance Curionoir New ZealandDue to its size and location New Zealand is sadly often overlooked and forgotten about. It’s indigenous culture isn’t particularly well known, about from the rugby haka or Jane Campion’s The Piano, so it’s a pleasure to see a niche fragrance company coming from that part of the world and from somebody with that background.

Founded by Tiffany Jeans - I know, great name! - she was born into a family of strong, creative women and immersed in Maori culture. After a career in fashion and advertising she turned to craft. It was during her wedding to film director Andrew Morton she crafted a series of hand- cast skull candles for each guest, individually wrapped in tulle. From this grew a range of bespoke perfumes, candles and finely crafted curios. 

Left - Curionoir - 'Cellar Feels' Parfum Extrait - 50ml - £150

Fragrance Curionoir New Zealand Perfume Candles

Now, a collection of seven fragrances and matching candles, housed in handblown glass made by Monmouth Glass next to the Curionoir flagship store in Auckland. 

I particularly liked ‘Cellar Feels’ which smells like Welch’s grape juice with a woody and leather base. 

Called Curionoir, because Tiffany always worked at night, it feels like the fragrances are deeply personal and a mystical gift from the lush ferny undergrowth of New Zealand. I just wish more of this was reflected in the packaging and branding. I want to learn more. 

Right - Feather My Tears Candle - £125.50

Love Island spike in men's grooming sales

ITV’s hit show ‘Love Island’ didn’t just dominate people’s evening viewing, this summer, it also inspired guys to get grooming. Recent data from Kantar Worldpanel showed a spike in grooming sales during the 12 weeks to 12th August 2018. The reality show is credited with helping to drive a 16% sales surge in men’s skincare products.

“Love Island not only tugged on shoppers’ heartstrings but also their purse strings,” said Fraser McKevitt, head of retail and consumer insight at Kantar Worldpanel, which produced the report.

Left - Love Island 2018 cause a spike in male grooming sales

An incredible 3.6 million tuned into to watch Dani and Jack win the show, breaking viewing records at ITV2. The scantily clad couples, supposedly all looking for love, clearly hit the right spot when inspiring guys to make the best of themselves.

Superdrug – which has sponsored the last three series of Love Island – launched a campaign promoting the products the Love Island boys will be using all summer. These included avocado and manuka honey conditioner, beard oil, volcanic cleansing wash and charcoal toothpaste to get that all important Love Island smile.

Lee Kynaston, Grooming Expert, Grooming Guru, says, “Those Love Island lotharios are a televisual reminder to all men that they need to raise their grooming game. The programme, with its identikit contestant selection, is saying 'this is what men are meant to look like in 2018' and the fact that the producers seem to pick guys that conform to a stereotype - hairless, muscular, tanned, perfectly-groomed eyebrows, blindingly white teeth - reinforces the image. I mean, where are the guys with hairy chests? It reinforces the idea that men shouldn't have a scrap of body hair. Love Island is manscaping's biggest cheerleader. Everyone of them is (forgive me for saying this) 'Instagram Ready’.”

Love Island adds that competitive element to how men look. Are you good looking enough? It clearly hit the marketing sweet spot.

“Well, the premise of the show is about getting the girl (or the boy if you're a female contestant) so it automatically associates a certain physical look with romantic - and sexual - success. Quiet sad really because we all know that outside of the Love Island/Instagram bubble that that's not reality.” says Kynaston.

Since the start of the new Love Island series, the number of men having eyebrow threading treatments at Superdrug have increased by 43% compared to last year.

Less than two years ago, only one in 50 appointments at Superdrug’s ‘Brow Bars’ were for male customers - today, men make up almost ten per cent of all appointments at the retailer who has 293 Brow & Lash Bars in its stores across the UK.

According to the brow specialists in Superdrug it appears younger men are opting for perfectly shaped dyed brows whereas the 40 plus generation are opting for a ‘tidy up’.

Simon Comins, Superdrug Commercial Director, says, “Programmes such as Love Island always influence customers to try out a new look and this year we’ve already seen males customers rush in to stores to get their guy-brows shaped and tidied.

“There has been a huge shift in male grooming over the past few years with a significant increase in customers looking for male grooming products with an 11 per cent increase in sales. But, male grooming has changed now it’s as likely to mean a concealer and lipgloss as shaving products.”

The UK’s men’s grooming market is said to be worth £2 billion a year and this is continuing to grow as men start to use more products and the grooming categories increase. Even Chanel is launching a men’s line called ‘Boy de Chanel’. It will first launch in South Korea, the biggest men’s grooming market in the world, with three "essential” products: a tinted foundation, coming in four colours, a matte moisturising lip balm, and four shades of eyebrow pencil.

Love Island spike in men's grooming sales

So, what are men buying into?

According to Mintel, “Popular reality TV shows including Love Island and TOWIE have helped to popularise a preference for hair-free bodies amongst younger men, underscoring a growing demand for men’s hair removal products.”

All six men who originally entered the Love Island villa did so with hairless chests and all but one sported some form of facial hair or designer stubble. 

Josephine O’Brien, analyst at Kantar Worldpanel, said:  “Male contestants were even shown lathering hair removal cream on their bodies in an open-air shower and the hairless chests of the islanders set the standard for men hitting the beach this season. 

Right - Will Love Island be looked back upon as 'peak grooming'?

“This is reflected in the sales – the number of men buying hair removal cream is up a staggering 17.7% in the past year and under-45s shopping for hair removal products have shot up 35.6% in the past 12 months.

“There’s less stigma among men about these grooming practices.  In fact, peer pressure is one of the factors contributing to the increase in sales, with British men more likely than their European counterparts to remove their body hair because of societal pressures.  This means that brands hoping to attract shoppers should be looking at the male market and how they can target this growing group – something the likes of Nads and Veet are already capitalising on.”

Over a quarter of men (28%) have shaved their body in the past 6 months with 72% of these removing hair from their intimate parts according to the Kantar Worldpanel data.

Brands such as Nads and Veet are capitalising on the trend and bringing out products targeted at men as brands like Nair. 54% of men who remove body hair describe themselves as image conscious compared to 41% of those that don’t, while the biggest driver to remove hair is personal hygiene with 42% saying a fear of odour makes them reach for the razor.

Men are also buying “Manscaping tools like the Philips OneBlade Face & Body and you dare not be pale these days, so a spray tan or bronzer is going to be important and I think there's a real interest in perfecting products - skincare products that act like real life filters.” says Kynaston.

“Increasingly men buy for themselves. Women are no longer the gatekeepers of male grooming. Yes, they're still popping things in the shopping trolley for their bf/husbands/sons, but increasingly men are seeking out their own grooming gear and treatments. They want to take charge of how they look and they have plenty of role models for inspiration. Plus, those role models are totally comfortable with manscaping, fake-tanning and eyebrow threading. I know a lot of men who are incredibly fussy about what skin and haircare products they use and they spend ages selecting the right gear. That wouldn't have been the case 20 years ago.” he says.

Love Island is a reflection of where the image conscious male is right now. This show intensifies and proliferates a single image of tanned, hairless and ripped males with glossy hair and white teeth. This type of look requires money, time and products and has clearly resonated with its male viewers and the subsequent uptick in grooming sales. 

What’s interesting is, it feels like this type of look is becoming increasingly dated and men are and will be turning to more hairy, masculine(?) and natural looking ideals. It’ll be interesting to see, when we look back in a few year’s time, whether Love Island will be seen as the era of the peak groomed man? 

Thursday, 23 August 2018 20:51

Tried & Tested The Modernist

The Modernist perfume tried tested review

“With 'the modernist', I designed a fragrance that has that self-assured simplicity. Bergamot opens the parfum and leads the way to a oral centre. Freesia felt like the perfect choice in this journey from citrus to timber. I love the sweet and sharp sensation of freesia and the way it softens and radiates a cleanliness on the skin. This is cradled in the warm hands of frankincense. I wanted a dominant, distinguished base and its complexity is enriched with labdanum, timber and even fruit, creating an autograph for the wearer. I’m not a big fan of scents that arrive before you do and linger in the room after you’ve left. For sure, be powerful and be bold, but let them remember how you smell, not just the smell.”  says John Evans, Fragrance Designer & Founder of the modernist fragrance. 

Taking a break from corporate life, John worked full-time as a writer and has seven novels published. Following his re-entry into the world of finance, John lived and worked in the US and Australia for a number of years. He and Andrew, his partner, returned to the UK in 2008 where John was the Managing Director of a global business.

Leaving full time work at the end of 2014, and at Andrew's suggestion, John began formalising a lifelong passion for fine fragrance. Soon after, John authored the modernist manifesto and founded the house of modernist fragrance. Formulated in London and made in England, this is his first fragrance.

Left - The Modernist - 50ml - £145

TheChicGeek says, “It’s refreshing when somebody has put everything into a single fragrance. This feels like a labour of love and another welcome addition to the family of small British perfume producers. I’m not sure whether ‘the modernist’ is the name of the company or the fragrance or both. But, I really like it. 

It has a cool, almost menthol, freshness at the top, with an element of turpentine. Then, a peppery layer which moves into spice and the comforting and intoxicating depth of the frankincense. It doesn’t dominate, but has a delicate richness, very much like John’s goal in the creation - see his quote above. The packaging reminds me of Miller Harris.”

Tuesday, 21 August 2018 15:54

Tried & Tested Tom Ford Fougère d'Argent

Tom Ford Men's Fougere D'Argent perfume tried tested review

“The classically fresh DNA of Fougère is reinvented, converging impeccable decorum with the modus operandi of an agent provocateur.” says Tom Ford, rather cryptically.

Left - Tom Ford - Fougère d’Argent - 50ml - £162

A bold burst of top notes features refreshing mandarin and bergamot blend with shimmering ginger. The masculine heart combines French lavenders of two kinds, one softly aromatic and one with a woody dimension. Amplified by geranium’s green and minty facets. The drydown reveals the provocateur teasing behind the fresh, razor sharp sophistication—the warm wood of akigalawood and coumarin extracted from tonka bean.

TheChicGeek says, “One of the lynchpins of men’s fragrance, ‘fougère’ is the lavender family of fragrances and has been the basis for many masculine scents and one we've, unfortunately, taken for granted. When it's good, it's really good, but, at times can smell very generic, especially in the mass fragrance market.

Here it gets Tom Ford’s silver hand over it - hence the name ‘Silver Fern’. 

This is a very solid woody fougère. It feels very constant, rooted to the heart and is much less fragrant, flowery and more woody - a signature of Mr Ford’s.

I’m not getting much of the top, while there is a note of spice, it’s dominated by warm woods. Tonka bean usually adds a metallic touch - that could be the d’argent bit of the labelling - but again, it’s distant.

This isn’t the greatest fougère, that’s reserved for the original, Houbigant’s 'Fougère Royale', created in 1882, but it’s Tom Ford’s woody version.”

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