Thursday, 15 January 2009 01:13

How to Choose a Suit

how to choose a suit patrick grantA well fitting suit of classical proportion in simple English cloth forms the foundation of a good wardrobe. An English Bespoke tailor will cut you a good suit. If your suit is going to last you twenty years it is best to avoid fad or fashion.
Patrick Grant of Norton & Sons

How to choose a suit

I would advise a gentleman to follow three simple rules.

1. Few suits but good suits.
2. Favour simple suiting but splendid Linen
3. Always let ones clothes be correct, never too formal nor too casual, never too worn nor too new.

I favour a single breasted two button jacket with a notched Lapel, straight pockets and side vents, and a higher cut flat fronted trouser. If your finances allow start with the following; dark navy flannel, dark charcoal flannel, navy Worsted, charcoal worsted, Glenurquhart check worsted, navy cable stripe worsted. For warmer days add a couple of fresco's, again in navy and charcoal.

Armed with his simple suits a gentleman can set forth to create his look with shirtings and silks as simply or as flamboyantly as his tastes allow. It is with his linens that an Englishman expresses his sense of dress. Ones shirts must be well cut and should be classically proportioned. Experiment until you find a collar shape that works. A good shirt maker will assist in your choice of cut, and help you guide you through the many thousand Cotton shirtings and tie silks that he will offer.

And one should neither overdress nor underdress. Dress for the occasion and avoid looking contrived. According to the wonderful George Frazier 'No well-dressed man's clothes should look either old or new'. I wear a dinner suit of my grandfathers, cut in 1936, which age and wear has rendered perfect. The Norton & Son's suit that I am wearing today I have worn at least one hundred times before. It took about fifty wears before it really Felt worn in. Purchasers of inexpensive suits will never experience this joy.

Norton & Sons is one of Savile Row's finest Bespoke Tailors. Established in 1821, the house made its name tailoring to the young and sporting amongst Europe's elite.
The firm gained eminence making sharply cut suits for rugged and robust gentlemen, such as Lord Mountbatten and the young Winston Churchill, for whom the firm made everything from dinner suits to racing silks. Lord Carnavon wore a Norton suit when he discovered Tutankhamun's tomb.
In recent years Norton & Sons has worked on clothing collections for British menswear Designer of the Year Kim Jones, British Designer of the Year Giles Deacon, young London designers Richard Nicoll, House of Holland, Christopher Kane, and New York's Rag & Bone.
Norton & Sons still hand cuts and hand sews every garment on Savile Row, using the traditional techniques perfected over centuries of tailoring in London.


www.nortonandsons.co.uk

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