Tuesday, 29 August 2017 15:31

ChicGeek Comment Is Topman Struggling?

Is Topman Struggling?

Are the wheels coming off at Topman? From zero to hero, Topman is the poster boy of how brands, thanks to fashion and the sponsorship of fashion weeks, can go from uncool to cool in little over a decade, but, has their run of dominance on the men’s high-street come to an end? 

Topman recently had a clear out of the top brass and creative. Gordon Richardson, who served as Topman's head designer for the past 17 years, has been pushed out along with many others within the Arcadia group. This is usually a sign of trying to stop the rot and starting something new.

Left - Will you be buying your tracksuit from Topman this season?

Taveta Investments, Arcadia’s parent company, doesn't break out individual figures for their brands, but financial figures released in June 2017 showed a 16 per cent drop in profits for the year to August 2016. Taveta Investments, indicated that annual profits plummeted to £211 million, while sales dropped 2.5 per cent to just over £2 billion. Taveta Investments, derived £1.7bn of revenue from the UK in 2016. That marked a fall from £2.2bn a year earlier, although up to £370m of that related to discontinued operations such as BHS, which was sold in 2015. 

That’s a huge drop of £500 million or £130 million, if you take out BHS. That’s still a lot of clothes not sold.

Is Topman Struggling? Gordon Richardson

So, what do we think has happened at Topman? Is it a case of these runs can’t go on forever and or is it something more serious?

One things for certain, it’s much more competitive than when Topman started out on its journey. Whether selling fashion or basics, there is much more choice, both offline and online.

Did they over expand? We know that Australia has struggled, with their franchise partner going into receivership recently, and the big push into America hasn’t really stuck as they don't seem to understand how fashionable us Brits are. American teens, in many cities, have nowhere to wear this kind of stuff.

Right - Has Topman peaked and how can they get their spark back?

Did it get too expensive? With labels like ‘Topman Design’ pushing the upper price points there is a perception that Topman was expensive, especially when compared to other high-street retailers. I’ve spoken to mums of teenage boys who say they leave Topman until last on a shopping trip as it’s usually the more expensive.

Topman’s buyers never committed to ‘Topman Design’. We had the shows, we had the collections, but when it hit the stores or online it was very bitty. They’d only make the trousers of a suit, for example, or items that didn’t really go with each other and the pricing was into three figures.

I think Topman has fallen into that gap of not being fashionable enough and not being cheap enough on basics and is falling into the void in the middle. They’ve lost the energy to ASOS, Boohoo and New Look.

I think there was a case of Topman believing their own hype too. You can’t afford to be arrogant in fashion and thinking you’re the coolest kid on the block, because things move fast and this will quickly bite you on the arse. The campaigns were a little too editorial and not relatable enough.

Fashions have changed too. Topman practically owned the skinny, three-piece suit and was selling volumes of a more expensive product. Now, the kids want sportswear and retro looking basics. It’s not the go-to place anymore. It’s lost its USP.

What are they doing? They’ve hired David Hagglund, known within fashion circles for founding a Stockholm-based creative agency which includes H&M and Hugo Boss as clients. He was also art director at Vogue Paris. David Hagglund is replacing Ms Phelan - Topshop head creative - and Mr Richardson in a 'newly created position' of creative director across both Topman and Topshop. Is combining Topman and Topshop a good idea? Or is this further cost cutting? It’s interesting they’ve given this important job to an Art Director type and it’ll be interesting to see whether Topman will get as much focus as Topshop. I doubt it.

The danger is, as they wobble they go safer, which is the wrong direction. Admittedly, Australia is having problems and America isn’t as fashionable as Europe, but young men want fashion and know it. Brands like ASOS and Boohoo are really pushing it, New Look has got a hell of a lot better and newness is the drug on the high-street.

Topman Design became a bit formulaic and they need to commit to it or scrap it. I think they’re going to find it hard to get that spark back. It’s very hard to do when you’ve lost it, but they’ve done it once before, so why not again.

There’s the juxtaposition between men’s basic and fashion led clothing. Basics are so competitive and difficult to make money from unless you’re doing huge volumes and buying basics from Topman is, well, a bit basic. Maybe they should leave that to Primark and Uniqlo and stick to making fashion.

I think they need to think more inclusive and not try to be too cool without losing the trends. Look what happened to American Apparel when they tried that achingly cool model. You need to be the coolest of the mainstream and, especially in Britain, have fun with it.

I think what we’ll see is, as leases run out, stores will close and they’ll be a renewed focus and growth of online. Topman needs to tighten up its collection and re-educate guys about what they do. As fashion cycles move, they need to aim for a new USP and focus on that. You can't be all things to all people today.

Note - A friend just mentioned on Facebook about the 'Philip Green Effect' and people boycotting his brands due to his handling of the sale of BHS and the hole in the pension fund. This could definitely be having an effect on Topman as many people are aware that he is the owner.

Published in Fashion

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Rochas

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

The Crystal Maze Jumpsuit

The all-in-one becomes a style adventure as the jumpsuit, finally, makes into men's wardrobes. Think of it as a cost saver, as you get a top and bottom in one.

From Left - Rochas, Prada, Prada, Lanvin,

Below - From Left - Ralph Lauren, Facetasm, Ami, Cerruti1881

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Ralph LaurenMenswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris PradaMenswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris PradaMenswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada Cerruti 1881

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Collars

The shirt is back! -you heard it here first - so that also means the collar is too. Wear it messy and open.

From Left - Prada, Marni, Wooyoungmi, Valentino

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Name Badges

This trend followed on from London - here

Left - Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris PradaThe Soviet Shoulder

Forget the Cold War, it's all about the cold shoulder for SS18. Think big and high. More hunched than hench!

From Left - Prada, Thom Browne,  Rick Owens, Paul Smith

Below Left - Balenciaga, Wooyoungmi, Dries van Noten

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris PradaMenswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris PradaMenswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Return of the Tie

We've seen the shirt - above - is back, so it only seems fitting that the neck tie makes a reappearance.

From Left - Marni, Marni, Kenzo, SSS World Corp

From Below - Paul Smith, Wooyoungmi, Fendi, Antonio Marras

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Clashing

The less it matches the better.

Left - Marni, Sacai

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vertical Stripes

They make you taller & thinner? Where do I sign?!

Left - Marni, Balmain, Etudes, Haider Ackermann

Below Left - Paul Smith, Cerruti 1881, Ami

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Long Shirt

Long & loose. Just don't call it 'long-line'!

From Left - Thom Browne, Alexander McQueen, Dries van Noten, Officine Generale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

HyperFlorals

Florals on Mephedrone!

Below - Kenzo, Ami, DSquared2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Long Short Sleeves

It's all part of the larger-than-life, oversized trend of trying to make your polo shirt sleeves touch your wrists.

From Left - Balenciaga, Balenciaga, DSquared2, MSGM, Neil Barrett

 

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

Menswear Trends SS18 Fashion Milan Paris Prada

 

Published in Fashion

Chic Geek comment on the state of menswear & LFWMLondon’s men’s fashion week got its Ronseal title, this season, replacing the old London Collections: Men moniker. The change didn’t make any difference to the lack of content and money, unfortunately, but, hopefully, it meant more to the wider public with many still not realising there even was a men’s fashion week in London.

Left - Daniel W Fletcher Presentation

London and Britain, is good at fashion, we’re good at menswear, we should celebrate it and this is the event to do that at. Twice a year, we come together, test the temperature of the industry and move forward in the way fashion always does. There will always be ups and downs and better and worse seasons, but ultimately it’s big business, from luxury to high-street, and we’re one of the best at it. Let’s champion that.

LFWM is just more pointless than previously, yet still necessary. It needs to be done, otherwise other cities will take the focus away from London and London needs to seen as a centre of ideas and fashion. 

When we leave Europe, the British Fashion Council need to lobby the government for more funding for an industry that employs so many people and encourages people to visit and shop in the UK. If we’re going to build a successful post-European future we need to focus on areas we are good at. Creativity is one of those areas. Fashion links many of these together and is the energy and catalyst for newness.

When then pedestrianise Oxford Street, fashion weeks should move there into see-through marquees and become inclusive to those interested in it and bankrolling it on the pavements either side.

What’s the opposite to ‘having a moment’? Because this is what menswear is currently facing. It’s not solely a London problem, affecting all the main fashion cities, but as fashion is a business, when it needs to change and save money, things get cut.

There was lots of talk during LFWM about whether this would be the last one, but I think if it was going to disappear it would have done so this season. The doom and gloom of the last LC:M was replaced with an optimism that things can only get better and the acceptance that those big brands, now missing, are gone. It’s okay, nobody died.

This was a medicated fashion week. A fashion week on Prozac. Things weren’t as important as before, so it felt more democratic. The must-have tickets didn’t exist so people were more equal than ever. The have and have-nots of fashion weren’t as separate and it felt more inclusive and less frantic.

One of the problems I have it predictablity. Designers showing exactly what you think they’re going to show. They don’t move their collections on. I don’t expect a 180 u-turn every season, but as nobody is really buying anything anyway what do they have to lose? They just make you wonder why you turned up. A signature style is fine, but a designer known for tasteful newness will always excel.

Another, is this idea that fashion collections look a certain way. It’s all a bit graduate Fashion Scout,  and was new sometime in the Thatcher era. The bong-bong-bong music and po-faced press releases suck the life out of the spectacle and the audience and has the bullshit detector on max. Fashion always needs its wanky, taking-itself-too-seriously label, I get that, but there’s only so much eye rolling one can do.

So, let’s think positive. When things hit rock bottom things can only go up. This half glass full attitude to men’s is what will keep it going. Those big brands disappearing will create room for something new: a vacuum for the future. The future is close, we just need to entertain ourselves until it arrives.

Published in Fashion