Displaying items by tag: Amiri

Friday, 03 April 2020 10:48

Best Men's Tie Dye Fashion

tie dye menswear socks sports Amiri MatchesfashionTie-dye is a trend that's always bubbling under, quite literally. At every price point, there's a bleed of colour for every fashion wanker. It's guaranteed to make you smile, and we could do with anything that does that right now. Darker tie-dye is more evening and formal, while full blown rainbow is more holiday and festival. Why don't you buy a kit online and have a go on some old white T-shirts? It's the perfect lockdown fashion activity. 

For those who aren't sure - just yet! - go for a pair of tie-dye sports socks and rock with a pair of summer shorts and trainers.

See MORE - Tie Dye - Special TheChicGeek Meets Stain Shade - Read more HERE

BUY TheChicGeek's new book - FASHIONWANKERS - HERE 

Left - Amiri - Tie-Dye Print Silk Shirt - £1000 from Matchesfashion.com

tie dye menswear socks sports Urban OutfittersLeft - Urban Outfitters - Typography Blue and Purple Tie-Dye Socks 1-Pack - £6

 tie dye menswear socks sports Levi'sLeft - Levi's - Tie Dye Trucker Jacket - £88 from Topman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tie dye menswear socks sports mnmlLeft- mnml - Spiral Wash Tee - £21

tie dye menswear socks sports By WalidLeft - By Walid - Marek Tie-Dye Raw Silk Trousers - £560, Ally Tie Dye-Effect Silk Shirt - £555 from Matchesfashion.com

tie dye menswear socks sports Issey MiyakeLeft - Issey Miyake - Tie-Dyed Cotton T-Shirt - £350 from FarFetch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tie dye menswear socks sports Tie dye kit amazonLeft - FabLab FL004 Toy £9.99 from Amazon

tie dye menswear socks sports StussyLeft - Stussy - Tie Dye Socks - £18

tie dye menswear socks sports CrocsLeft - Crocs - £27.99

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tie dye menswear socks sports Maison ScotchLeft - Maison Scotch - £104.95

tie dye menswear socks sports UmbroLeft - Umbro - Calidoscope Sweat - £55

Below - iets frans - Yellow Tie-Dye Sweatshirt - £46 Urban Outfitters

tie dye menswear best iets frans Urban Outiftters align=

Published in Fashion

Online shopping is allowing luxury brands to get away with lower quality

It’s subjective, I know, but if you’ve bought something from a ‘luxury’ brand, recently, you will probably notice the quality isn’t quite what it once was. On the unstoppable growth trajectory of higher prices and sales, the quality hasn’t stayed consistent: no doubt increasing already inflated margins.

I’m not naive, I understand you pay a premium for a designer name or brand, but there was always a minimum quality to the product, leaving you, the customer, satisfied and at least without the feeling of being ripped off.

I’ll give you an example. I bought one of those new GG buckle Gucci belts online, 18 months ago. I hadn’t felt it, or seen it, I just ordered it online. It was a simple black belt after all. You think you know what will arrive.

What turned up felt like a free pleather school belt. I’m not being facetious, but there was no quality there. When you’re charging £250 and you can’t even offer a decent strip of leather to take the strain of holding your trousers up, there’s clearly something wrong.

Why didn’t I send it back? When it arrived at home, in insolation, seduced by the packaging, and Gucci was so-hot-right-now, you just shrug your shoulders and think, "okay, so it’s not the best, but it’s what I wanted and it’s cool ATM". (Damn you hype!)

It’s when I look back, and think about that belt, I feel, that if I’d handled and seen it in the shop, I probably wouldn’t have bought it in the first place. I would have felt the quality and moved on.

And, so to my theory - the growth of online is allowing mainstream luxury brands to get away with lower quality products. Consumers are more accepting in their own homes, they have nothing to compare it to at the time and the thought and hassle of sending something back is making people keep things they wouldn’t have necessarily bought in a physical store.

“Shopping is very much a human multi-sensory experience so it follows that we want to use as many of our senses. Emotion plays the dominant role in our buying decisions so the in-store experience will always be far superior to the online experience. As Boxpark MD Roger Wade put it ‘Shopping online is like watching fireworks on TV’ says Andrew Busby, Founder & CEO of Retail Reflections.

There’s no doubt online has contributed to the massive growth of these brands, whether on their own websites or third parties. Last year Gucci’s online sales posted triple-digit growth on their branded website and that’s without all the other online retailers. Gucci didn’t hit €6.2 billion turnover in 2017 on physical stores alone.

“This all depends on your definition of ‘Mainstream Luxury’. The word ‘Luxury’ is banded around all too often. True luxury is confined, generally, to bricks and mortar shopping, hence the resistance of major houses to enter the online market. When I consider ‘Luxury’ I think of brands such as LV, Chanel, Loewe etc,” says Darren Skey, Founder/Director of Nieuway Limited, and former Head of Menswear at Harvey Nichols.

“I wouldn’t class brands such as Off White, Amiri, Vetements as ‘Luxury’.  What we are seeing is the luxury brands such as Loewe and LV seeing the growth potential of hype products and as such are designing products with this in mind.  This leads to more quantity produced and a lower quality, compared to their main ranges,  Fashion details are hard to produce on a large scale.  Unfortunately, there is no correlation in price reductions, as you would expect with economies of scale,” says Skey.

It’s hard to prove this point, but it’s an interesting factor to think about. Net-a-Porter group recently introduced a new service  for their “Extremely Important People”, where the delivery person waits to see whether you want the item or not, after they deliver it. It’s an instant reaction to the item(s) and it would be interesting to know whether this has increased or decreased returns. Obviously, they want the latter.

Quality is subjective and brands vary. But I think we’re seeing an overarching trend towards higher margins and lower quality from brands trying to still offer ‘luxury’ and compete with other brands’ stratospheric growth in turnovers.

There’s also a generational shift to think about. Since 2016, the global luxury market has grown by 5%, with 85% of this growth generated by Millennials according to a report by A LINE, a global branding & design studio. These younger consumers don't have as much experience and product to compare the quality to and brands are taking advantage of this.

“The expectation of the younger consumer is also changing and I think this is an interesting observation. For the younger consumers it is more important to have the latest hype piece regardless of the quality.  And, as we know, the majority of the Millennials shop online,” says Skey.

Brands have made it easier to return products, but unless it’s the wrong size or nothing like pictured, I think people are more accepting in terms of quality.

“I don't think that shoppers are unwilling to send things back once purchased online. Fashion is not cheap and I don't believe we are in an economy where this can be an option. I also think retailers are making the process of sending product back easier,” says Skey.

‘I am predicting a backlash to the returns culture we are currently witnessing - both from retailers and environmentalists. The average returned purchase in the UK passes through seven pairs of hands before it is listed for resale. According to Iain Prince, supply chain director at KPMG, "It can cost double the amount for a product to be returned into the supply chain as it does to deliver it”.’ says Busby.

What brands have to remember: when you’re not cool or hot anymore, the thing that will keep consumers returning is quality. This lowering of quality is short-termism and greedy and will ultimately be a big factor is diminishing future sales and brand loyalty. 

I’ve also written about brands which offer great value, like Fiorucci. here

Published in Fashion
Friday, 16 February 2018 11:56

Buyer’s Guide Harvey Nichols SS18

Lara Djandji, Menswear Buyer, Harvey Nichols

Raf Simons New Order Jacket Harvey Nichols Menswear

“From Raf Simons, SS18 saw the re-launch of key pieces from Joy Division’s ‘Unknown Pleasures’ album and I can’t get enough of the entire collection – my favourite piece being this jacket - it’s the perfect mix between fashion and music. For real fans, we’ve also bought the cap to complete the full look.”

Left - Raf Simons - New Order Oversized Denim Jacket - £1135

Amiri Jeans SS18 Harvey Nichols Menswear

“Amiri’s exceptional quality and craftsmanship of each pair of jeans makes it easy and chic to wear them everywhere – from a flight to a night out.”

Left - Amiri - Broken Black Distressed Skinny Jeans - £645

“I love this iconic Dries Van Noten look – it’s so effortless yet still elegant and can easily be worn with the signature boxed shoulder coat to transition between seasons.”

Below - Dries van Noten - Reedley Checked Wool Coat - £1010, Carlton Printed Ramie Shirt - £565, Patrini Checked Wool Trousers - £390

“I love this vintage inspired jacket by Dior. Designed by Kris Van Assche, it references the punk and rave designs of the 70s and 80s, but also makes anyone looks instantly cool.”

Bottom - Dior Homme - Jacket - £490

Dries van Noten Coat SS18 Harvey Nichols Menswear

Dries van Noten Shirt SS18 Harvey Nichols Menswear

Dries van Noten Trousers SS18 Harvey Nichols Menswear

Dior Homme Jacket SS18 Harvey Nichols Menswear

Dior Homme Jeans SS18 Harvey Nichols Menswear

 

Published in Buyer's Guides

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