Displaying items by tag: Art

Banksy clutch brick bag Croydon Gross Domestic Product menswearThe biggest thing to hit Croydon since the tram, Banksy’s pop-up, Gross Domestic Product, the homewares brand from Banksy, opened a shop showcasing his latest and greatest hits collection of social commentary. The affordable, well, in the context that one of his paintings recently went for £10 million, pieces are available through a ballot system. You’ll be notified if you’re lucky to win anything and then you have the option to buy it. You only get one pick!

Here’s my choice: “This fashion-forward accessory is made from a genuine real life house brick and is perfect for the kind of person who doesn’t carry much but might need to whack someone in the face. Probably no less practical than the output of most haute couture fashion houses. Made from random bits of old handbag so yours may differ from the one pictured. Signed.” says the website.

Not that Banksy seems to know that clutches don’t usually have handles, but who am I to tell him anything…

You have until October 28th 2019 to register your interest.

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Published in Fashion
Friday, 23 March 2018 14:16

Style Icon Tate Britain’s The Squash

The Squash Tate Britain Style Icon Anthea Hamilton

A mysterious style icon has suddenly appeared. Inhabiting the hallowed halls of Tate Britain, this new character looks like a badger from a Shakespearean fantasy. Called ‘The Squash’, it is an immersive installation combining performance and sculpture by 2016 Turner Prize nominee Anthea Hamilton. 

The Squash Tate Britain Style Icon Anthea Hamilton loewe shirt matchesfashion.comThe Squash has been created for the annual Tate Britain Commission, supported by Sotheby’s, which invites contemporary British artists to create new artwork in response to the grand space of the Duveen Galleries.

Left - All about the stripey Squash

Right - Loewe - Striped Asymmetric Cotton-Canvas Shirt - £795 from matchesfashion.com

The Squash Tate Britain Style Icon Anthea Hamilton

Anthea Hamilton has transformed the heart of Tate Britain into an elaborate stage for a continuous 6-month performance of a single character, dressed in a colourful squash-like costume. Over 7,000 white floor tiles have been laid to span the length of the galleries encasing a series of large structures that serve as podiums for a number of works of art from Tate’s collection, chosen by Hamilton. 

Right - The Squash has seven costumes designed in collaboration with Creative Director Jonathan Anderson at the fashion house Loewe

The artist is influenced by the early 20th century French writer and dramatist Antonin Artaud and his call for the ‘physical knowledge of images’, it is this bodily response to an idea or an image that she wishes to examine in The Squash

The Squash Tate Britain Style Icon Anthea Hamilton Dsquared2 white ruffled menswear Far FetchHamilton has designed seven costumes in collaboration with Creative Director Jonathan Anderson at the fashion house Loewe, that incorporate the colours and shapes of varieties of squash or pumpkin. The performers get to select a costume each day, informing and reflecting their individual presentation of the character as they inhabit the space. 

On trend, The Squash is rocking vertical stripes and ruffled shirts in his clinically tiled play area. Get the look with a striped shirt or go for white ruffles; the bigger, the better.

Left - DSQUARED2 - Ruffled Bib Shirt - £415 from FarFetch.com

 

The Squash Tate Britain Style Icon Anthea Hamilton burberry riding shirt matchesfashion.comRight - Burberry - Herringbone Cotton Tie-Neck Riding Shirt - £495

The Squash Tate Britain Style Icon Anthea Hamilton

Left & Below - The Squash gets to play in Tate Britain's Duveen Galleries 

Like Stripes? See The Beetlejuice Striped Suit

The Squash Tate Britain Style Icon Anthea Hamilton

Published in Fashion
Friday, 05 May 2017 14:07

ChicGeek Comment No Ifs, Just Butts!

Male butt bum undercarriage Wolfgang TillmansIn the modern world, where the male body is constantly objectified, you’d be right for thinking there isn’t much we haven’t seen. Naked men are an everyday occurrence on TV, advertising and social media. But, there is one part we haven’t seen or appreciated before, until now.

Left - Nackt, 2, 2014, Wolfgang Tillmanns from the recent Tate Modern exhibition

celia hempton male nude grooming bollocksIs it time to appreciate the male undercarriage? Are men’s bollocks having a hirsute moment? 

These aren’t the manicured porn-star-type bollocks from the nougties, but masculine, hairy and au naturel. Artists such as Wolfgang Tillmans and Celia Hempton are focusing on the sack and crack, giving them some love, in the visual sense. 

RightCelia Hempton (2013) 

The male ball sack is going mainstream. Definitely not social media friendly - damn your American uptightness - but it’s the new the erongeous zone and is a signifier of the growing appreciation, and acceptance, of the male derriere. 

Stephen Fry once said his favourite statue was 'David' by Francis Derwent Wood, on the Hyde Park Corner roundabout, because of his arse. Niche gay publications like Butt and the celebration of gay art at Tate Britain in the 50th year of the part legalisation of homosexuality in 'Queer Art' all make 2017 the year of the masculine arse crack.

So, put that groomer and razor away, the male undercarriage is going mainstream, just don't mind the hairy bollocks!

Below - ‘Ben’ (2017) by Celia Hempton from Counter Editions

male arse butt Celia Hempton artist

Published in Grooming

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