Displaying items by tag: Conde Nast

luomo vogue closing time inc wallpaper death of magazines Jocks Nerds

News in that the most famous pure fashion men’s publication is to close. The Italian publication, L’Uomo Vogue’s last issue will appear in December. With a readership said to be 300,000, which is large within the men’s market, it seems a strange move by publisher Condé Nast, if this is the true figure.

Left - David Beckham shot by David Bailey. The Italian men's fashion magazine, L'Uomo Vogue is to close

I think what it signifies is not the change in consumers, but advertisers. This is all about advertisers changing their spend and while consumers have been disappearing in numbers since the beginning of the 21st century, the brands still felt confident about advertising in magazines and keeping them profitable. Until now.

L’Uomo Vogue’s closure is a reflection of the downsizing of Milan Men’s Fashion Week. What used to be busy with big name ‘superbrands' has seen many downsize to presentations or merge their men’s shows with their women’s, and thus showing later in the calendar. You’re not going to spend lots of money promoting something that is not a priority or is contracting.

These were the brands big enough to buy the back covers or a couple of pages just inside the front, and this was where the profit is or was for publishers.

Many luxury fashion companies, especially the Italian family run ones, have been slow to get with digital due to the fact many of those in charge didn’t understand it or want to understand it. They’re idea of luxury wasn’t the internet and they like too much control. 

As budgets have been cut and also the delayed investment in digital sapping funds, L’Uomo Vogue is an example of the swingeing cuts the men’s industry has been facing. Italy is a powerhouse of Italian brands and even they are ‘adjusting’ to the future. Armani has reduced the number of labels, Dolce & Gabbana shelved D&G, even the recent big money maker, Gucci, now show their men’s in with their women’s show.

Also said to be closing is the independently published, Jocks & Nerds. The UK quarterly title, established in 2010, known for it’s workwear and vintage aesthetic, is sending its final issue to bed. There’s never been a good time to be an independent publisher, but now is particularly tough. I think fashion moving towards something more sporty and less ‘heritage’ may have also been a factor.

In other news, Time Inc., publisher of Wallpaper*, is moving to E14. Yes, me neither! I had to Google it, even though I’ve lived in London my whole life. It’s Mudchute, yes, Mudchute. There’s nothing wrong with Mudchute on the Isle of Dogs, but talking to a PR the other day, they said their courier doesn't even go that far. Times are tough, but are they really that tough?

It feels like the change in media is speeding up and the majority of magazines and publishers seem to be down to the bare bones. There isn’t much left to cut back on, but it’s a surprise a title like L’Uomo Vogue has folded before others. Watch this space.

Published in The Fashion Archives

The end of the social media space raceTo quote the supermarkets, the space race is over. Much like the frenetic expansion we saw in the food sector with supermarkets opening store after store in a saturated market, which didn’t increase sales and just cannibalised those they already had, the same could be said for social media. 

We’ve seen a huge appetite for volume since its inception. Followers, subscribers, likes etc., brands and companies have spent lots of time, effort and money on growing their social following to as big as possible and, for many, continues to be the main focus of their attention. This isn’t sustainable.

Twitter has stalled in its growth of users at around the 300 million mark and Instagram, which just passed its 500 million users threshold, will no doubt start to slow or stall. There are only so many people in the world, after all. 

This October, Condé Nast International’s chief digital officer, Wolfgang Blau, said, “You can’t win a race for reach,” at the Digiday Publishing Summit in Nice. He said that Vogue does not have to be gigantic to be very influential. For too long, too many were “drunk on reach” and forgot to focus instead on deeply understanding their readers.

This is a change in language and tactic from the one of the world's main digital publishers and a welcome one.

What is an 'acceptable' number of followers? Many people/brands look to others for this competitive and, sometimes not honest, number. It’s never enough.

The new age of social media will be healthy niches influencing people and rippling out into the wider population. Engagement will become key and producing content that is original, clever and contemporary will be the way to stand out. They'll be new ways to monitor engagement which don't require as much effort from the recipient.

What’s that inspirational quote about Jesus only having 12 followers?  Okay, one did unfollow him! But, the space race is over and big isn’t always best.

Published in The Fashion Archives

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