Displaying items by tag: Hardy Amies

Thursday, 12 December 2019 14:58

ChicGeek Comment Savile Row: Cozy or Cold?

Drakes Savile Row cozy retail designWithout doubt the most famous menswear street in the world, for the uninitiated, Savile Row could be something of an anti-climax. While the name is known the world over as the home of male sartorial elegance, the reality of the street is something quite small, higgledy piggledy and with little on show to inspire or buy. It’s a mishmash of designer brands, traditional tailors and workshops, and empty shop units.

Left - Drake's new Savile Row store

A small side street behind elegant Regent Street, Savile Row has become much bigger than the place itself, and while brands desire to be able to put Savile Row in their addresses and on the sides of their bags, it can a difficult place to make money. There just isn’t that much traffic.

While nothing new, the street has seen something of a brand churn of late. Chester Barrie is closing down, Hardy Amies disappeared and the short lived Abercombie Kids store in the old Beatles’ Apple building is being pushed back into the larger Burlington Gardens store over the road while it turns itself back into offices for their European business. 

I was recently invited to drinks at the Kilgour store on Savile Row and while on the way over I wanted to check out the new Drake’s store which had taken over from Alexander McQueen’s menswear store.

One of the bright spots of British menswear, Drake’s, the colourful accessories and preppy menswear business, has just moved around the corner from Clifford Street to a larger space and has built up a strong brand with locations from New York to Tokyo. Here, the new store has cosy striped window-type seats and an entire library of books. It looked like the kind of place you’d want to hang out in, or, heaven forbid, want to spend time in. It's welcoming. The product isn’t cheap, but it’s done properly.

Contrast this with the Kilgour store, which looks like a designer Swiss morgue, and these two juxtapositions perfectly illustrate the new mood in retail design. One reeks of personality and is overflowing with the owner’s touches, while the other is strict to the point of being a retail vacuum. 

There was a time, a few year’s ago, when the majority of Savile Row brands were being snapped up by Chinese conglomerates. Fung Capital, the private investment vehicle of the Fung family that controls Hong Kong sourcing and apparel mega-corporation Li & Fung, bought the most including Gieves & Hawkes, Kilgour, Hardy Amies and Kent & Curwen. While they splashed the cash and moulded each for a particular type of customer at the beginning, things have become tougher and they show a tiring of interest. They placed Hardy Amies into administration in January, while selling to Trinity, another Chinese group, the Italian/French tailoring house Cerruti who cancelled their catwalk show and stopped the designer collection’s entire production.

Drakes Savile Row cozy retail design kilgour

What looked like little, individual outfits on London’s Savile Row often had hundreds of branded stores in China, invisible to outsiders, but they’ve all become quite bland and lacking personality with no clear direction with a continual revolving door of creative directors or in-house design teams. All these brands have become faceless.

Another new bright spark on Savile Row is the new ‘J.P. Hackett No.14 Savile Row’ store in the elegant townhouse Hardy Amies restored. The new Hackett store is warm and welcoming, and is saying “come in”, “make yourself at home” and “relax” with its homely yet elegant interior by designer Ben Pentreath with input from Jeremy Hackett.

Right - Inside Kilgour Savile Row

What Drake’s and Hackett both have is a figure head who is involved and makes decisions and menswear has always latched on to these men who lead.

Michael Hill, the current creative director of Drake’s, who is responsible for the brand's full wardrobe offerings, has a great eye and taste, while Jeremy Hackett has nearly 40 years of experience in the vintage menswear trade and then creating his own eponymous label. And this is what it all comes down to, people. You need a singular, strong vision to offer direction and also a domestic homeliness.

Stark, cold and soulless retail spaces are being replaced by the perennial idea of a traditional shopkeeper welcoming customers into their worlds. Admittedly, Hackett previously had a store on Savile Row which didn’t work, but this new bespoke concept is hoping to elevate the standard Hackett product and, moving the wholesale showroom from Bond Street and combining it with retail, will probably see them save money while in a stunning Georgian townhouse which will look good the world over.

Hackett Savile Row cozy retail design

Savile Row can be so much better and it’s always worth remembering what you thought on your first visit there. These two recent additions are adding some colour and Britishness to a street which had become something neither designer nor tailored. 

Savile Row needs to hold onto what is good, but also be open to try new things. In 2016, Westminster Council said only new stores will only be allowed to open if they do not replace “bespoke tailoring uses”; “sell bespoke, unique, limited-edition or one-of-a-kind products”; and are “complementary to the character and function” of the zone, but that doesn’t mean 'The Row' should be stuck in a timewarp. 

Left - Inside the ‘J.P. Hackett No.14 Savile Row’ store

This isn’t about just preserving Savile Row, it’s about making it more successful. It should be welcoming to all British brands and not look down on commercialisation. The skills that have survived this long will continue to survive and these two new additions show its about individuals going back to the idea of being a nation of shopkeepers rather than anonymous 'brands'.

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Published in Fashion

fashion menswear hunting scene corduory shirt men's emmettThe majority of printed shirts are produced in plain cotton, so to find something this fun in baby cord is a pleasant autumnal surprise. Hardy Amies (RIP) did a collaboration with the East London retailer Present (RIP) a few years back featuring a hunting scene. And, while I missed out then, I wasn’t going to miss out on this shirt from Emmett.

A bucolic English hunting scene with dogs and horses running boldly through a light green and white field is as timeless as any British seasonal event. Looking like a child’s bedspread, in a good way, obvs, team with a masculine sober suit in navy or brown and traditional English shoes.

Left & Below - Emmett - Hunting Scene On Baby Cord Shirt - £175

Disclosure - This shirt was gifted by Emmett 

fashion menswear hunting scene corduory shirt men's emmett

Published in Fashion
Thursday, 25 June 2015 08:43

TheChicGeek’s London SS16 Scrapbook

Lou Dalton menswear 2016 springHardy Amies spring 2016 menswearThe home of TheChicGeek and menswear, London was a four day spectacular of the creative East London meeting the more refined West. Here is TheChicGeek’s scrapbook of men's trends for #SS16:

Exterior Pockets

Designers have realised that we no longer want to be handicapped by our manbags while we still have the issue of having many additional things to carry. So, why not make a feature of your bulging pockets?

From Left - Lou Dalton, Hardy Amies 

Hardy Amies neon trend menswearTopman Design neon trendNeon

Men have become so brave, today, with colour that neon is no longer the scary super tone it used to be. More of an accent, think of it like your wardrobe highlighter.

From Left - Hardy Amies, Topman Design

 

 

 

 

 

 

Topman Design menswear trends SS16Agi & Sam menswear London trendsBlurred Lines

Horizontal, vertical, anyway you like. It may look a little 'Inmate Chic', but, hey, it's all about the swagger.

From Left - Topman Design, Agi & Sam

Oliver Spencer SS16 suede jacketGieves & Hawkes suede jacket SS16Summer Suede

The luxury item of SS16. This season, suede is a hybrid between a shirt and a jacket. Just make sure it's in the softest, butteriest suede in an earthy reddy brown tone.

From Left - Oliver Spencer, Gieves & Hawkes

 

 

 

 

 

 

Burberry Prorsum menswear lace trendMenswear Burberry menswear SS16 trendsMace

Male lace or 'Mace' can be as dangerous as it sounds. It's probably best layered with glimpses, rather than full on out there, unless you're as a skinny as a Burberry model.

Left - Both Burberry Prorsum

Coach menswear LCM SS16 animal printsBurberry Prorsum animal prints menswearAnimal Highlights

Yabba dabba doo or don't depending on how you feel about animal prints. These should look like fun animals: the kind you'd win at the fair!

From Left - Coach, Burberry Prorsum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dunhill new suit greenTopman Design new suit New Suit

I always feel Winston Churchill's boiler suit inspires these kind of bomber/Harrington type suits. The new dress down dress up for those wanting to look put together while looking young, sporty and contemporary.

From Left - Dunhill, Topman Design

Alexander McQueen menswear pyjama colour SS16Hardy Amies menswear SS16 trends pyjama collarPyjama Collar

Peter Pan, Princess or plain old PJ, the shirt colour is light, relaxed and open for the forthcoming SS16 season.

From Left - Alexander McQueen, Hardy Amies

With thanks to Smart ForFour

Published in The Fashion Archives

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