Displaying items by tag: Photography

Wednesday, 25 November 2020 19:24

ChicGeek Comment The Economy Of Bad Styling

the importance of fashion stylists celine

If a picture paints a thousand words, what does a stylist do? In fashion, they are the story tellers. Stylists, those individuals who decide what and how to dress models and celebrities for many brands’ campaigns and visual assets, have long been taken for granted. Much like photographers and digital cameras, in recent years, their magic of making something look more expensive or chicer than it is has been overlooked and labelled as simply ‘dressing’.

Left - Hedi's idea of cool or just plain bad? Celine

Paula O’Connor, ex Fashion Editor and Consultant, says, “A stylist's job is to tell a story with clothes, to put them into a narrative. This could be for glossy pages of editorial/ magazines or film, or simply co-ordinating everyday outfits to suit someone's lifestyle, whilst understanding perfectly how to translate current trends in fashion into outfits to suit that person’s needs and their lifestyle whilst maximising their image and confidence.”

The majority of people don’t recognise good styling, but they certainly notice bad, and it feels like there’s a lot of it around at the moment.

And, that’s the crux of it, a stylist’s main job is to make, professionally, things or people not look bad. With many brands making cuts or struggling to produce content in lockdowns with less travel, then bad styling is becoming much more noticeable. While some brands may go deliberately for the slightly more ‘edgier’ or grungier look, even Balenciaga has a slickness in its ugliness, there’s a difference between this and simply bad. It’s the fashion equivalent of a hipster venue asking you to drink out of jam jars. It’s a cost saving spun as being cool.

Lockdown has really brought to light the importance of good styling and therefore a good stylist. Marketeers listen up. We became so blasé about perfect images, that, I think, we took them for granted pre-COVID, but it’s only, now, we can really see the difference and it’s coming from even the biggest of brands.

the importance of fashion stylists paul smith

“Stylists are definitely taken for granted and they do not get enough respect for the skills they have”, says Jessica Punter, Freelance Stylist with almost 20 years’ experience, associate lecturer and Ex GQ Style and Grooming Editor.

“Stylists usually have an eagle eye over the whole fashion industry and draw on influences from a wealth of other areas such as art, music and pop culture. They can help steer or hone a collection and create fresh appeal. They can bring a lot to the table creatively, if given the chance.” she says.

Good styling has many contributing factors; concept, art direction, casting (model choice), location, props, looks (outfit choice), lighting, and, finally, how it’s all put together. It takes a refined eye and that’s worth paying a professional for. Many brands look like they’re doing it all DIY and it does nothing for their products.

Like anything visual, what is good and bad is subjective, but there’s a level. It also changes according in local markets and who they are targeting. It’s knowing which images to use when and where. While Europeans may scoff, the images could appeal to Asia or America.

Right & Below - Paul Smith AW20 looking like a hot mess?

“First, international brands cater to different markets. What appeals to one territory might not appeal to the next.” says Punter. “I often think of how different Nike US is to Nike EU. I know which I prefer, but it's all about knowing your market.  Second, in the pandemic era we are seeing skeletal crews and brands needing to improve 'efficiencies'. During the first lock down I heard models were dressing themselves with samples sent to the photographer. I also heard celebrities were wearing outfits they had worn before for public appearances, rather than relying on a stylist to bring fresh looks. Third, there's a lot of dross product around. If a collection is really weak it can't necessarily be saved by styling.” she says. 

the importance of fashion stylists paul smith

Even the biggest brands have trimmed their expenditure. Do you think brand’s making cutbacks can be seen in their visuals? 

“Yes, I am sure it is deemed necessary to make cuts, to use in-house staff and to limit outsourcing, but these short term savings inevitably have a negative impact on overall quality.” says Punter.

“There is definitely a noticeable difference in shoots that reflects that cutbacks. E-comm is increasingly shot flat instead of on a model, and there is a simpler approach to selling.” says O’Connor.

Can we put this down to lockdown issues of lack of expensive locations or doing things from home etc.?

“Certainly the impact can't be ignored. At the same time there have been lots of amazing distanced shoots. Self-styled Robert Pattinson for GQ US was a highlight for me. However, the clothes he wore were still selected in advance by a stylist, and no doubt heavily mood boarded and pre-styled into looks, which he may well have adapted. But the overall lesson is really that nothing can replicate a strong creative crew working closely, physically together.” Punter says.

“I think, previously, stylists researched and referenced a lot more.. films, art, photography catwalks .. but now everything is so fast and immediate, so there is a lot of imagery that is 'thin' in content.  Also social media has boosted consumerism.” O'Connor says.

There is no formula for good styling. You need talented people, but it’s also an instinct, especially in something as unpredictable as fashion. A good stylist will be able to make the best of what they have, even if the budgets are tight.

“No one realises how much hard work goes into styling, It depends on the client, but there is never enough budget for what they want, so stylists sometimes have to work miracles!” says O’Connor. 

the importance of fashion stylists superdryThere too isn’t a formula for bad styling, but get a few of those contributing factors - listed above - wrong and the chances are the pictures won’t be very good. It’s a false economy for brands and marketing departments to make cuts in this area, especially if they’re trying to peddle ‘luxury’. They are devaluing the product and the brand.

Left - AW20 Superdry styling looking far from contemporary

A great stylist is “someone who creates trends rather than follows them and has an innate understanding of what makes a great image.” says Punter, and this is something not worth skimping on.

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Published in Comment

Tim Walker Wonderful Things Victoria & Albert museum exhibitionThe V&A unveils the Tim Walker: Wonderful Things exhibition featuring Tilda Swinton, Grace Jones, Karen Elson and Grayson Perry, as well as over 150 brand new images inspired by objects in the V&A’s collections. The exhibition is the largest-ever exhibition on the photographer to-date, celebrating his 25-year career.

Left - The exhibition is centred around objects Walker has chosen from the V&A's collection

TheChicGeek says, “When I stopped religiously buying fashion magazines, probably over a decade ago now, fashion photographers feel off my radar. Their names were pride of place at the beginning of each editorial and they became as familiar as the models, editors and stylists.

But, things changed, budgets were cut and everything started to become advertiser lead, very samey and anonymous. Probably the reason why so many people have stopped buying them.

And so, to Tim Walker, his career really started to take off after I’d stopped buying magazines and as such I really don’t know that much about him. I missed the exhibition he had at Somerset House, which really seemed to cement his name.

His style is fantasist, Alice in Wonderland, Gulliver's Travels, fish eye lens type images, which, in this world of billions of daily images, are very memorable, which shows their strength. The first room is a collection of his previous work. (It’s a shame some of them weren’t reproduced larger, but there are a lot to cram in).

Tim Walker Wonderful Things Victoria & Albert museum exhibitionThen, each thematic room is based around an object from the V&A’s collection and the subsequent images Walker has produced inspired by and in respect of.

This idea, which they could easily roll out to other creative figures, is a good way of connecting one type of audience - here fashion - into exploring more areas of the museum. Walker’s connection to his items seemed quite lite and it would have been nice to have some more history or emotion to his objects. Let’s be honest, you could probably connect any random idea with something inside the V&A.

Right - The first room - love a Space Odyssey ceiling 

Here we have ‘Wonderful Things’ ranging from Aubrey Beardsley's illustrations to some rather wonderful French stain glass windows featuring crowns and maces to Edith Sitwell’s gold shoes. It's quite a mix, but that's part of the fun. As always with the V&A, the staging is great, and it all has the fantasy touches we all know and love these days. I particularly liked the highly lit, Space Odyssey-type rooms and, overall, it was all playful and approachable.

It did make me think about where can fashion photography really go? These images are great and everybody loves them, but, like fashion, it's a continual rehash of previous themes and styles and these images could easily been produced at any time in his 25 year career. It doesn't feel contemporary, and, until fashion changes, fashion photography won't either."

 Below - More images from the exhibition

Tim Walker Wonderful Things Victoria & Albert museum exhibition

Tim Walker Wonderful Things Victoria & Albert museum exhibition

Tim Walker Wonderful Things Victoria & Albert museum exhibition

 

Tim Walker Wonderful Things Victoria & Albert museum exhibition

Published in Fashion
Friday, 05 May 2017 14:07

ChicGeek Comment No Ifs, Just Butts!

Male butt bum undercarriage Wolfgang TillmansIn the modern world, where the male body is constantly objectified, you’d be right for thinking there isn’t much we haven’t seen. Naked men are an everyday occurrence on TV, advertising and social media. But, there is one part we haven’t seen or appreciated before, until now.

Left - Nackt, 2, 2014, Wolfgang Tillmanns from the recent Tate Modern exhibition

celia hempton male nude grooming bollocksIs it time to appreciate the male undercarriage? Are men’s bollocks having a hirsute moment? 

These aren’t the manicured porn-star-type bollocks from the nougties, but masculine, hairy and au naturel. Artists such as Wolfgang Tillmans and Celia Hempton are focusing on the sack and crack, giving them some love, in the visual sense. 

RightCelia Hempton (2013) 

The male ball sack is going mainstream. Definitely not social media friendly - damn your American uptightness - but it’s the new the erongeous zone and is a signifier of the growing appreciation, and acceptance, of the male derriere. 

Stephen Fry once said his favourite statue was 'David' by Francis Derwent Wood, on the Hyde Park Corner roundabout, because of his arse. Niche gay publications like Butt and the celebration of gay art at Tate Britain in the 50th year of the part legalisation of homosexuality in 'Queer Art' all make 2017 the year of the masculine arse crack.

So, put that groomer and razor away, the male undercarriage is going mainstream, just don't mind the hairy bollocks!

Below - ‘Ben’ (2017) by Celia Hempton from Counter Editions

male arse butt Celia Hempton artist

Published in Grooming

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