Displaying items by tag: Anna Wintour

menswear Victoria & Albert Museum review V&A Fashioning Masculinities The Art of MenswearHoping to take the toxicity out of masculinity and give a fresh lens onto the world of menswear is the Victoria & Albert Museum’s latest show, Fashioning Masculinities: The Art of Menswear.

Unbelievably, it is the first major V&A exhibition to celebrate ‘the power, artistry and diversity of masculine attire and appearance'. Presenting around 100 looks and 100 artworks, displayed thematically across three galleries, it features the extravagance of the European courts, to the subtle elegance of bespoke tailoring, to the vitality of today’s international fashion scene, all fashioned and refashioned over the centuries. Contemporary looks by established designers and rising stars sit alongside historical treasures from the V&A’s collections and landmark loans: classical sculptures, Renaissance paintings, iconic photographs, and powerful film and performance.

Left - 'Undressed' room welcomes you to the exhibition

Gender is like night and day or light and dark, it changes all the time. It is pretty much established that men can wear pink nowadays. Even Niccolò Machiavelli recorded a quip by Cosimo the Elder “in his Istorie back in 1526 that 'two yards of pink cloth can make a gentleman’”.

This is such a big subject that it is hard to focus. What are you supposed to take away?

With an exhibition like Dior, for example, the subject line is already established and the curators simply have to flesh it out and select the best examples. This is a subject that could go in any direction.

There is plenty of decoration here, it could do with focusing on a few key characters or historical influencers. There is a portrait and suit of Edward VIII's, and, Cecil Beaton’s fancy dress bunny outfit, that could easily have an exhibition on their own. The exhibition could have been called ‘Influencers in Menswear’ or ‘Menswear in Art’ and had more detail. It’s usually the people that make clothes more interesting.

Masculine energy, good or bad, is missing. The first room ‘Undressed’ feels confused and flat and doesn’t really inject anything sexual into the proceedings. There is no desire here and little objectification. It the difference between male beauty and masculinity. One is much easier to visualise than the other.

Where the exhibition did get stronger was with the portraiture. Historical portraits mixed with doublets, gloves and the most fantastic Grinling Gibbons carved cravat once owned by Horace Walpole. The rest of the exhibition was a kind of greatest hits, but with a few B-sides and modern remixes thrown in.

Sponsored by Gucci there is an expectation of an over-the-top wowness from the Italian brand which is missing here. The V&A should have been Guccified and made over like Oscar Wilde’s velvet lined panic room, but it just feels a little flat.

menswear Victoria & Albert Museum review V&A Fashioning Masculinities The Art of MenswearThese blockbuster exhibitions need to feel like the best retail, just with the world’s finest objects, where you are seduced and bounced along the show.

Right - A billiard table houses the rainbow of men's pieces both contemporary & historical

Ironically, the room with the most masculine energy was the final room which houses Billy Porter’s, Harry Styles’ and Bimini’s dresses with a black glossy floor and film projection. It felt contemporary, confident and uplifting while spilling the beans that Anna Wintour made the final decision to add a tailored jacket to Harry's American Vogue cover look. Now, that is fashioning masculinity.

Open until 6th November 2022

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menswear Victoria & Albert Museum review V&A Fashioning Masculinities The Art of Menswear

menswear Victoria & Albert Museum review V&A Fashioning Masculinities The Art of Menswear

menswear Victoria & Albert Museum review V&A Fashioning Masculinities The Art of Menswear

menswear Victoria & Albert Museum review V&A Fashioning Masculinities The Art of Menswear

menswear Victoria & Albert Museum review V&A Fashioning Masculinities The Art of Menswear

 

menswear Victoria & Albert Museum review V&A Fashioning Masculinities The Art of Menswear

menswear Victoria & Albert Museum review V&A Fashioning Masculinities The Art of Menswear

menswear Victoria & Albert Museum review V&A Fashioning Masculinities The Art of Menswear

 

menswear Victoria & Albert Museum review V&A Fashioning Masculinities The Art of Menswear

Published in Men
Monday, 29 November 2021 23:02

Film House of Gucci

House of Gucci film review geekTheChicGeek says, "If you received a Teddy Ruxpin in the 1980’s your parents had money. Alessandra Gucci, the daughter of Maurizio and Patrizia Gucci, in the new film, House of Gucci, unwraps the talking teddy bear at their ski chalet in St. Moritz just as her parents’ marriage is starting to disintegrate.

The film centres on the grandson of the Gucci founder and his rollercoaster relationship and ultimate murder under his wife’s auspices, played by Lady Gaga.

Left - The Gucci Mob

Gaga is intense and totally commited, down to the bad make-up, Jared Leto is unrecognisable as Maurizio’s cousin, Paolo Gucci. Al Pacino is like a mob boss as his uncle, Aldo, while Jeremy Irons adds some class as Rodolfo Gucci, Maurizio’s father, who early on knew the true motivation for Patrizia.

The film has a great soundtrack, though it doesn’t correspond exactly with the timeline, add in New York, disco and glamour and it brings to mind the recent Halston series with Ewan McGregor. I didn't realise Maurizio was still at Gucci when Tom Ford arrived to completely reinvent the brand.

The styling is good. Gucci’s famous snaffle loafers make a starring role, plus there’s a few Jackie bags and monogrammed prints. This will only propel the mega-brand to even greater exposure and popularity. Even the bad 1980’s jewellery. This film is a reseller’s dream. 

The only jarring moments were the disco scene at the beginning - it wasn’t very 70s and looked like a made- for-movie set with strange dance floor - and Domenico de Sole’s white socks - not sure any Italian of taste would wear white sports socks with black shoes.

Paolo Gucci’s eccentric and mocked designs could surely have found at home with the Etro family?! And the budget Wintour and Leon Talley are funny.

The film is hammy, but that’s okay because every actor is committed. I thoroughly enjoyed it."

House of Gucci film review geek

House of Gucci film review geek

House of Gucci film review geekFrom Top:

Lady Gaga as Patrizia Reggiani (Gucci)

Jared Leto as Paolo Gucci

Adam Driver as Maurizio Gucci

Salma Hayek as 'psychic' Pina Auriemma

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Published in News
Wednesday, 01 July 2020 13:42

Book The Chiffon Trenches By André Leon Talley

book review The Chiffon Trenches Andre Leon Talley Anna WintourA name dropper who was dropped, André Leon Talley’s latest memoir, The Chiffon Trenches, charts his life and career through the glittering war zone of fashion’s front row and his time at American Vogue. From his childhood in the southern states of America, raised by his grandmother, to New York, bouncing between there and Paris, depending on his roles at various magazines, it’s a who’s who (or who he knows) of fashion and society in one of the most exciting periods of 20th century fashion. Think the great 1970s period of Yves Saint Laurent.

Left - André Leon Talley - The Chiffon Trenches published by HarperCollins - £20

While I’ve never read Talley’s journalistic work, being pictured on the arm or by the side of American Vogue editor Anna Winter saw him enter fashion folklore. With his voluminous kaftans and capes he became a memorable fashion caricature alongside Wintour’s bob and dark sunglasses.

As a journalist, this is lite and while he thinks he’s describing things, throwing in a few French terms just feels a bit dated and doesn’t impress. Well, not this side of the pond anyway. It’s fluff. 

The beef between YSL and Karl Lagerfeld is legendary and it’s interesting to hear about his dealings with John Galliano and Alexander McQueen, but apart from that there’s no great insight other than continually reminding you how he knows his fashion history and what a great dresser Lee Radziwill (Jackie O’s sister) was. 

Clearly used to the golden years of magazines, when you could expense everything, had a car at your disposal and got put up in the Ritz, he glosses over his failings, like losing his job at Ebony, they couldn’t afford him, or so he says, and then messing up a huge opportunity writing YSL’s book because he took much on and didn’t have the time. Doesn’t look good, or sound professional.

Wintour and Lagerfeld dropped him a few years back, so the reason behind writing this book was probably the death of the latter. He knew that his friendship with Lagerfeld was the reason Wintour held him so close. 

This, along with his documentary, The Gospel According To André, has a feeling of still trying to stay relevant and visible. But, what does he do exactly? He seems to mostly accompany rich women when they go shopping. He loves ‘a strictly private invitation funeral mass’ and has to drop in how he’s always frow or got a select invite to something or another.

He hates it when others don’t like his chosen gifts. It’s a lot of giving and receiving special stuff. All about the alligator. It has to be the best, most expensive and this attitude feels again dated. He moans about people treating him badly yet carries on doing things for them or going to their launches and dinners. He wants to feel important. Has to. 

He compares Naomi Campbell to Elizabeth Taylor. Really? #eyeroll And addresses Edward Enninful as a Sir, which he’s not. He has an OBE, and, for a man who think he knows everything, this feels like a stupid thing not to know. I'm surprised the publisher didn't pick this up.

Sycophantic, he’s like one of those people who hears something new then acts like they invented it. It’s all Goyard luggage and blacked out cars. He’s sucked in by breeding and heritage and he's spoilt by a free and expensed lifestyle. Those days are over. 

The book is quite repetitive; Met Gala, Anna Wintour Costume Center, Diana Vreeland, Lagerfeld, Chanel, Chanel, Chanel… 

There’s a best dressed list at the end of the book and even a ‘picture section’.

Takeaway - He’s a self-professed ’elegant walker’ and, while bitter about his detachment from Wintour, Talley has kept all the receipts, literally, and they are all here to read. Burn.

Published in Fashion

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